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Creating a Customer Avatar

What we’re going to do in this tutorial …

We are going to define your customer avatar, which is a profile of who your customer is and what their interests, hopes and fears are.

Why we need to do this …

We do this for a number of good reasons:

  • It’s essential to have an image of who we are talking to when we design our products and marketing messages.
  • Knowing their interests helps us find and target them more cost effectively

How we are going to do this …

  • We divide our target market into segments. We can do this in a number of ways:
    • How good/skilled/experienced they are
    • What their appetite and budget is 
    • What their desired outcome is
  • For each one, create an avatar using the questions below. 

Section 1: Demographics

  • Name:
  • Age:
  • Gender:
  • Marital status:
  • Age and # of children:
  • Location:
  • Field of occupation:
  • Job title:
  • Annual income:
  • Education level:

Section 2: Challenges & Pain Points

  • What are this customer’s top 3 challenges?
  • What are this customer’s top 3 pain points?
  • What is your customer not good at?
  • What is your customer uncertain about?
  • What does your customer no longer want to experience?
  • What does your customer no longer want to feel?
  • What does your customer have bad dreams about?

Section 3: Goals, Desires and Values

  • What are this customer’s top 3 goals?
  • What are this customer’s top values?
  • What are they committed to? What do they believe in?
  • What they want to get better at?
  • What do they want to experience?
  • What do they want to feel?
  • What does your customer have pleasant / daydreams about?

Section 4: Sources of Information

  • What books does your customer read (which other people would be unlikely to)?
  • What magazines does your customer subscribe to (which other people would be unlikely to)?
  • What blogs and websites does your customer visit (which other people would be unlikely to)?
  • Which conferences and events as your customer attend (which other people would be unlikely to)?
  • What experts does your customer follow (which other people would be unlikely to)?
  • What other interests or activities as your customer have or do (which other people would be unlikely to)?

Section 5: Buying Behaviour

  • What objections would your customer be likely to have?
  • What role does the customer have in the purchase process?
  • Who else would be likely to influence the customer in terms of buying?
  • How comfortable is the customer likely to be at buying online versus face-to-face or over the phone?

Section 6: Outcomes & Alternatives

  • What transformation is the customer looking for (from and to what):
  • How would they visualise that transformation? (Where would they be and what would they be doing?)
  • What alternatives do they have to our solution, and why don’t they give the same result?

Section 7: Context of Problem or Need

  • How or when do they discover they have a need?
  • Who do they first discuss solving this problem with?
  • Where do they usually do their research to solve this problem?
  • Where do they look to find companies to solve this problem?

Peter Cameron-Burnett

The founder of AgileOS, Peter has over 25 years experience in business and technology. As well as running multi-million pound projects and events, he has written a number of books on business and has run training courses and workshops for business owners and entrepreneurs in countries around the world. He is also the founder of DeliverAid, an initiative that helps disadvantaged children in impoverished areas by providing educational materials and low cost computers such as the Raspberry Pi.

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